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Saddle Pads Need To Vent

Some saddle pads come with straps to thread your girth through and billet straps that have a hook-and-loop fastener, like Velcro, at the end. These fasten around a billet strap and keep the pad from slipping. We noted a wide variance of where billets and girth straps are set on the pads, especially the less-expensive pads. The placement you need varies with the type of saddle you use, but we noted the most problems with dressage-type saddles. You’ll be wise to check that the strap placements are where you want them before you get the pad dirty.If you don’t like the straps, take a

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A thought-provoking commentary on why the World Equestrian Games simply don't work. read more

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Swelling on your horse’s leg may be as simple as lower leg edema from standing in his stall to a bowed tendon to a serious infection. Look at the conditions surrounding this swelling to decide if it’s a veterinary emergency and to get an idea of the prognosis. An acute swelling that’s warm and tender to the touch suggests a recent injury or a developing infection. With infection, the area may feel hot. Check your horse’s temperature. A fever suggests infection. If so, look carefully for a small puncture wound site or any area with drainage.  An read more

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