News

More News

McNasty And RapLast Stop Chewing

Most any horse will gnaw on wood now and then, especially trees. An extensive Australian study of wild horses found they had definite preferences in terms of bark texture and time of year. They may eat the more tender, slender ends of tree branches. However, this natural behavior is different from the wood chewing domesticated horses do because wild horses leave tough, woody parts undisturbed.The belief persists that horses may chew wood because of a mineral deficiency, extremely irritating to eyes and nose.When using antichew products outdoors, reapplied the product as soon

This is subscriber-only content.

To continue reading, please log in or subscribe to Horse Journal online.

Share This Video:

Comments

Hock Pain Is Prevalent in Horses

Grant Miller, DVM

Veterinarians can often predict where a horse might be sore, based just on the horse's athletic endeavors.? Jumping, for instance, is hard on the coffin joints.? Roping and driving can be tough on the withers and shoulders. But tHere's one ailment that seems to be prevalent in just about every equine endeavor: hock pain. That makes hock problems a subject that we all should understand, especially read more

Some Pointers on Joint Infections

Grant Miller, DVM

So many horse owners live on pins and needles during the days following their horse's joint injection, in fear of the dreaded infection. However, several misconceptions about joint infections can cause unfounded concern. read more

Good-bye, Blanco.

Cynthia Foley

The beautiful Andalusion in Lord of the Rings was euthanized in early April due to an undetermined illness. read more

FREE Horse Journal Email Newsletter


Submit