News

More News

McNasty And RapLast Stop Chewing

Most any horse will gnaw on wood now and then, especially trees. An extensive Australian study of wild horses found they had definite preferences in terms of bark texture and time of year. They may eat the more tender, slender ends of tree branches. However, this natural behavior is different from the wood chewing domesticated horses do because wild horses leave tough, woody parts undisturbed.The belief persists that horses may chew wood because of a mineral deficiency, extremely irritating to eyes and nose.When using antichew products outdoors, reapplied the product as soon

This is subscriber-only content.

To continue reading, please log in or subscribe to Horse Journal online.

Share This Video:

Comments

What I Learned This Month From One Of My Horses

John Strassburger

Discussion about training horses, learning from your horses and training breakthroughs. read more

The All-Important Bed Check

Contributing Writer Beth Benard discusses the importance of checking the horses one last time before going to bed for the night. read more

Did You Know? Joint Supplements

A picture with information about joint product efficacy. read more

FREE Horse Journal Email Newsletter

Copyright 2014 by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. an Active Interest Media company