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McNasty And RapLast Stop Chewing

Most any horse will gnaw on wood now and then, especially trees. An extensive Australian study of wild horses found they had definite preferences in terms of bark texture and time of year. They may eat the more tender, slender ends of tree branches. However, this natural behavior is different from the wood chewing domesticated horses do because wild horses leave tough, woody parts undisturbed.The belief persists that horses may chew wood because of a mineral deficiency, extremely irritating to eyes and nose.When using antichew products outdoors, reapplied the product as soon

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