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McNasty And RapLast Stop Chewing

Most any horse will gnaw on wood now and then, especially trees. An extensive Australian study of wild horses found they had definite preferences in terms of bark texture and time of year. They may eat the more tender, slender ends of tree branches. However, this natural behavior is different from the wood chewing domesticated horses do because wild horses leave tough, woody parts undisturbed.The belief persists that horses may chew wood because of a mineral deficiency, extremely irritating to eyes and nose.When using antichew products outdoors, reapplied the product as soon

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Barefoot vs. Shoes

Grant Miller, DVM

No matter what the reason(s), it appears that barefoot trimming is trending upwards. The increasing number of barefoot horses leaves one to wonder if a day could come when horse shoes are a rare sight. read more

Strength Is So Important In Horse Training

John Strassburger

Training horses for eventing or dressage is a lot like training human athletes for sports like gymnastics, track or figure skating. Actually, I’d say that training a horse to event is a lot like training a person to do all three of those sports. read more

Fly Sheets 2014 – Lots of Improvement

Beth Hyman

In this trial, we noticed the horse fly sheets really trended toward extreme protection. Many we tested included neck covers, belly coverage and very fine mesh to protect the horse from smaller insects and UV rays. And the equine Bucas Zebra print sheet has some validity to the “stripes confuse flies” research from a few years ago. read more

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